Archive for the ‘rifel range at tahoe’ Category

February 12, 2017

Shooting on the Move


All you have to do is watch the dash cam videos of law enforcement traffic stops to realize that when bullets start flying, no one is standing still. The static range training most people do is great for building fundamentals, but don’t think that is where combat marskmanship begins and ends. Simply put, you have to develop a skill set that allows you to shoot on the move effectively and practice it often. Your life may very well depend on it.

What follows are some key points of consideration about shooting on the move as I see it. Students in my classes know I always include a comprehensive shooting on the move segment in every class, and I consider it absolutely essential training each and every time you go to the range. You need to train to a realistic standard and apply key principles to allow you to meet that standard. Here goes:

1) Make your lower body do it’s job; the most critical aspect to shooting on the move is minimizing vibrations that transfer above the pelvis (belt line) that in turn affect accuracy. You can’t eliminate vibrations, just dramatically reduce them. This is done by laying your feet down in a ‘rolling’ fashion such as heel to toe roll, bringing your feet closer together when walking to mitigate the side-to-side sway many people display, and most importantly make your knees absorb the shock of each step. Frankly, you can half ass the first two principles, and if you do a great job using your knees like torsion suspension you can still effectively shoot on the move. Using a visible laser at home as a training aid walking around your house (to the dismay of your significant other) to practice your movement techiques has value as the laser provides excellent feedback as to what is working and what is not.

2) Bend the elbows and stay flexible. Being rigid or tense does not work well in shooting, and never more so than when doing mobile shooting. You have to stay loose and allow your joints to absorb the vibration so as to allow your weapon to almost seem like it is ‘floating’ in front of you. If you are moving and your weapon is doing a lot of sharp ‘dips’ during movement as perceived through the sites, then you’re doing something wrong (often times the knees are the culprit; remember don’t just bend your knees, take the shock of each step out with your knees – big difference). Remember to stay loose.

3) Train to a realistic standard. Accuracy will suffer somewhat while moving –- there is no way around it. A good rule of thumb is you want to be able to cover your shots with your hand -– roughly a 6 inch circle in the center of the chest. Of course you will occasionally throw some shots out of that circle but never more than 2 to 3 out of 10 shots fired. If so, you need to dial back in on the basics. By this standard shooting on the move is approx a 15 yd and in exercise with a handgun and 20 yds and in with a carbine. You can put shots on target farther out than that, but accurate upper torso hits become much more difficult and the shooting will turn into suppressive fire instead of surgical shots on target. Remember, the bad guy ain’t gonna stand still either, so you need to keep it real when training for this critical skill.

4) Practice shooting on the move in all directions. Of course moving straight toward an opponent or straight back is not ideal but may not be avoided. The fact of the matter is you need to be able to shoot on the move in any direction, despite what some instructors teach. When and where you have to engage a threat cannot be accurately predicted in the real world, unlike in an IPSC 3 gun match. Remember the hostile action of the threat is what dictates your actions not the beep from a shot timer.

5) Practice trigger control. Most shooters who have bad shots with a handgun on the move do so because they jerk the trigger, NOT because they are moving. This occurs because the brain exaggerates the movement of the pistol in relation to the target and this causes many shooters to ambush the trigger instead of cleanly breaking the shot within an acceptable wobble zone. A Red Dot sight on a carbine definitely makes this task easier, but I have found the better you become at mobile shooting with a pistol the skill set, the better it transfers to the same drill with a long gun.

6) The more you do it the better you get. Make it a goal to practice this skill every time you go to the range. In this case, literally, practice makes perfect. As with many other difficult shooting skill sets, the better you become at mobile shooting the better you will become in other aspects of combat marksmanship. Some ranges won’t allow it, but make no mistake it is a potentially life saving skill, so seeking out a range that does allow it is critical. You can certainly practice the moving aspects at home with dry fire, but at some point you have to get to the range and bust some caps while moving.

A closing thought is to remind readers that many of the static range drills are very useful for building a solid grasp of the fundamentals, but at some point you have to take it to the next level and apply yourself at mastering those same skills on the move.

This is not my article but it makes some interesting points.  we do allow shoot and move at our range in fact we do training.  we have individual classes starting yet $300. we have a 3 gun class all day long for $1000.00 per individual. This does not include ammo. That is your responsibility.  If you need firearms, we can supply that too for a minimual charge.  it is better to use your gun at these drills and practices since that’s what’s going to be relying on.


Give us a call at 775-741-0735. You will not be disappointed

Advertisements

How the new law gun purchases and recreational marijuana in Nevada

November 27, 2016

​Sheriff’s Message, Week of November 20th                       
Community Friends,
An old adage wrongfully attributed to Winston Churchill states a pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty. What he did say was “For myself I am an optimist—it does not seem to be much use being anything else….” A life filled with optimism produces less life stresses, which has shown to prevent chronic disease, and helped people live longer, happier, and more productive lives. The recent election results, regardless of the chosen candidate or ballot question has produced many pessimists on both sides; I however, have chosen to be an optimist.
In a civil case that originated in Moundhouse over a denied gun sale to a medical marijuana card holder, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in September of this year that the marijuana card applicant was not allowed to purchase the gun from the dealer, and the dealer was right in denying the sale. This is a very liberal court; however, they have established case law in that no firearm transfers can be made to marijuana users.
The ATF is updating their background check form to include a warning that medicinal and recreational use of marijuana is illegal for gun transfers. Sometime in January 2017, a new ATF form will be used with the new warning. Our new state law mandates transfer background checks, in which firearm buyers have to answer questions, including the marijuana question. Answer truthfully and the transfer is denied; lie on the question and they could be prosecuted for a federal crime; transfer the gun without a background check conducted by a licensed FFL dealer, it is a gross misdemeanor under the new state law.
We are working with our District Attorney’s Office in the development of a county ordinance for vehicle marijuana prohibitions, similar to the open alcohol container laws. If approved by our commissioners, the ordinance can be enacted long before our state legislature can pass a law to help improve road safety.
The provision in the new law prohibiting marijuana cultivation within a 25 mile radius around retail marijuana establishments is causing concern in group of marijuana growers. In fact, they are already talking about passing another petition to eliminate the 25 mile rule. We believe county zoned retail marijuana establishments can stabilize crime rates by minimizing home invasions and burglaries associated with home grows and stored cash from illegal sales through regulated and controlled cultivation facilities and retail establishments.
There has been some citizens asking us to retire our K-9, Deputy Bo because of the new marijuana law. Deputy Bo is trained for the detection of marijuana, and we still need him in our schools detecting marijuana products to help deter the drug from coming on campuses. Marijuana is still illegal for person under 21 to possess, he can assist us in other criminal investigations, and he is more than just a drug do; he is a dog that can apprehend criminals and help protect our deputies on the street. We will not be retiring him.
And finally, one of our local manufacturing companies, Trex, recently donated $5,000 to the Lyon Sheriff Advisory Council (LSAC) in support of our canine program. We wanted to thank them for their support in helping to make our community stronger and safer.
As always, keep the faith.
Al

Family outing

December 13, 2014

Come join us for a family outing. Learn safety and respect for firearms. We will instruct any age will parent permission and with the child willing to listen and follow instructions.

Make your reservations now. Take a look at http://nevadagunrental.com for more information.

You can call me or text me at 775-741-0735. We will get back to you.

Have a great day.